News

Dr. Al Bovik receives The Edwin H. Land Medal

November 20, 2017

Dr. Al Bovik received the Edwin H. Land Medal from The Optical Society. The Land medal was created in honor of the great American scientist, entrepreneur, and academic Edwin H. Land, who invented the instant camera, founded and chaired the Polaroid Corporation, and invented the Retinex theory of color constancy in vision.  The medal is awarded in recognition of pioneering work empowered by scientific research to create inventions, technologies, and products.  Dr. Bovik was given this award for his work on neuroscience-

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Dr. Som Mukhopadhyay publishes chapter in "Neurotoxicity of Metals", an Advances in Neurobiology book series

October 25, 2017
Dr. Som Mukhopadhyay published a book chapter entitled "Inherited Disorders of Manganese Metabolism" in the Advances in Neurobiology book series.  This chapter reviews what is known about two inherited genetic disorders of manganese metabolism and their role in disease and neuropathology. Read more about Dr. Som Mukhopadhyay publishes chapter in "Neurotoxicity of Metals", an Advances in Neurobiology book series

Dr. Mary Hayhoe receives the 2017 Davida Teller Award from the Vision Sciences Society

June 8, 2017

Each year the Vision Science Society bestows the Davida Teller Award to an outstanding woman vision scientist with a strong history of mentoring.  This award was established in honor of Davida Teller, an exceptional scientist, mentor and colleague, who for many years led the field of visual development. 

http://www.visionsciences.org/2017-davida-teller/

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Dr. James Sulzer and Dr. Jarrod Lewis-Peacock publish in Nature Reviews Neuroscience

March 2, 2017

Dr. James Sulzer and Dr. Jarrod Lewis-Peacock published a review in Nature Reviews Neuroscience entitled "Closed-loop brain training: the science of neurofeedback".  Neurofeedback is a psychophysiological procedure in which online feedback of neural activation is provided to the participant for the purpose of self-regulation. Learning control over specific neural substrates has been shown to change specific behaviours. As a progenitor of brain–machine interfaces, neurofeedback has provided a novel way to investigate brain function and neuroplasticity. This Review examines the

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Jagruti Pattadkal receives HHMI International Student Research Fellowship

January 18, 2017

 

Jagruti Pattadkal, INS graduate student in Dr. Nicholas Priebe's lab, received an international Student Research Fellowship from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute for her research proposal entitled "Linking population activity to behavior in primate area MT".  Jagruti was one of 20 applicants, selected from a pool over three hundred forty, that were selected by a panel of top scientists and graduate educators bases on their high potential to make innovative contributions to science in the future.  Jagruti is the second

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INS Faculty Eyal Seidemann, Bill Geisler and Boris Zemelman receive NIH U01 Cooperative Research Grant

December 8, 2016

Eyal Seidemann, Bill Geisler and Boris Zemelman receive NIH U01 Cooperative Research Grant entitled “An Optical-Genetic Toolbox for Reading and Writing Neural Population Codes in Functional Maps”. 

The goal of this research project will be to develop and optimize an optical-genetic toolbox for reading and writing neural population codes in functional maps of awake, higher mammals.  This will be accomplished by developing a new genetic method that will provide long-term expression of transgenes in primates with cell-type and activity- dependent specificity.  A two-

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INS Grad Students receive SfN Next Generation Award for Brain Matter podcast!

November 9, 2016

INS graduate students Anthony Lacagnina (Drew Lab), Lauren Kreeger (Golding Lab) and Matthew Davis (Zemelman Lab) are receiving the 2016 Next Generation Award from the Society for Neuroscience for creating, producing and hosting "Brain Matters" a podcast about neuroscience and the scientists behind the bench.  

Listen to all the Brain Matters podcast episode for free at http://brainpodcast.com/about

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Neuroscientist Weighs How Realistic Bourne Character's Memory Loss Is

Neuroscientist Weighs How Realistic Bourne Character's Memory Loss Is

July 27, 2016

This week, Matt Damon returns to the big screen as Jason Bourne, a secret agent who has forgotten his entire life and is piecing it back together while confronting political and economic conflicts. We wondered how realistically the series depicts brain science.

The core premise behind the series – which now includes 13 books and 5 movies – is that it's possible for a traumatic event, like being shot, to cause someone to forget everything about their past, yet still retain all their skills and abilities. For example, Bourne still remembers how to fight with martial arts

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